Betty’s Bay Hack Report No 667

The battle for Betty's Bay: Report on Hack no 667 A huge effort by the troops all but cleared the verges of Disa Circle and surrounds. Well done to everybody! The tea was made by Merran Silberbauer, and the sandwiches by Jane Fearnhead. Thank you ladies! Penguin Place again donated the bread, so thank you to them too. The troops were Mike Begley, David Bossenger, Tom Dreyer, Rachel Faria, Ulli Niemann, Chris Geldenhuys, Willem Stiglingh, Bernard van Wulven, John and Sue Weaver, Lewis and Caroline Silberbauer, new hacker David Morant and Frik Potgieter. Ed Silberbauer…
read more

Gardeners’ Circle 22 October 2018

The fourth gathering of the Gardeners’ Circle* took place in Rooi Els on the wind-free, sunnily warm morning of Monday 22 October. Numbers attending the Gardeners’ Circle have grown on each successive occasion, and this time totalled 49 people, who strolled happily from venue to venue under the direction of Dave de Klerk who had organised the proceedings. The aim once again was to visit three local gardens - each with its own specific climate and soil conditions, and to explore the effect these have on the plants one can hope to grow successfully. No…
read more

Something every hacker knows

Courtesy of treepopper.co.za A Tree Popper is a rugged, simple tool that makes it easy to remove invasive/unwanted plants and trees. PRACTICAL - A simple, yet effective, one-person, back-saving implement, used to extract unwanted trees and plants, roots and all. PRODUCTIVE - No repetitive clearing in the same area – the perfect tool for follow-up, final clearing. COST-EFFECTIVE - A rugged tool that needs no maintenance at all. ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY - Organic and manual operation with no herbicides, petrol, oil, grease or high-speed blades to cause damage to natural vegetation. ADAPTABLE - The Tree Popper…
read more

Celebrating Women in Conservation: Nosicelo Luhabe

By CapeNature  “I want to thank CapeNature for giving us this opportunity, it means a lot to us and it really opens doors for us.” These are the words uttered by Nosicelo Luhabe after receiving her certificate for her tremendous work as a Pupil Field Ranger under the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP).  During the month of August this year, CapeNature celebrated some of the amazing women in the organisation. Here is the story of Nosicelo Luhabe. She started as a general worker in 2015 and qualified as a Pupil Field Ranger in 2018.  When we asked her about her journey, she wrote a beautiful thank…
read more

Thanking Priscilla Blake

CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION FOR PRISCILLA BLAKE This huge smile from Priscilla tells it all. At long last Priscilla has a small but tangible token of her very substantial gift of Ethel Dixie paintings to Kogelberg Branch. A visit to her new home, a small room in Heritage Manor’s Health Care Centre, found her happy and alert, in fact she was reading Gerald McCann’s Seven Years among the Giants, the giants being Protea cynaroides. (McCann was a forester in the Kogelberg.) It was a signed copy as was her Your Place in the Kogelberg by Tim…
read more

Don’t Be Trashy!

Nature offers so much and it is the responsibility of us all to conserve the unique natural heritage resources of the Western Cape for the benefit of future generations.  Nature works like a natural factory to provide us with clean, fresh water and other natural ecosystem services. Water travels all the way from our majestic mountains, through rivers, wetlands and dams before it comes out of your tap. All rubbish ends up in our water ways and the ocean and has a severe impact on the natural environment.  The process starts with each one of us – to reduce our consumption…
read more

Talk Report – Sept 2018

Plants and light Chris Whitehouse Living and gardening in the fynbos, we are very aware of the impact of the specific soil conditions of our gardens and the need to provide protection from the wind, but we may not give much thought to the amount of light that various plants require. That is unless your home is close to the mountain, where you are in shade for a large part of the day, particularly during the winter months when the sun is low on the horizon.  Sunlight and its effect on plants was the topic of the interesting talk given on Saturday 15 September by Chris Whitehouse, who runs the Philipskop Mountain Reserve, near Stanford.  Chris began by reminding us why the leafy natural world around us is predominantly in harmonious shades of…
read more

Walk Report – Sept 2018

Walk Report for 15 September 2018   It had been months in the making – a combined walk, bringing together members of the Kirstenbosch Branch and the Kogelberg Branch of the Botanical Society, and it didn’t disappoint.  When you have upward of twenty-two eager fynbos junkies making their way through the Brodie Link part of the Hangklip Nature Reserve two things immediately become apparent, you move more slowly and you see more flowers. Aided by such botanical legends as Ivor Jardine and Corinne Merry, we could be sure of a fascinating morning. A bewildering variety of Aspalathus, Cyclopia, Diastella, Serruria, Erica, Leucospermum (including the exquisite sprawling L. prostratum in full flower), Lachnea, fragrant Agathosma, Gladiolus, Mairia, Erepsia, Wachendorfia paniculata, the endemic Hangklip form of Saltera…
read more